OSU Leadership Center

College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences

Recent Blog Posts

By: Beth Flynn, Monday, August 22nd, 2016

"Being persistent means that when things get in the way, as they will, you will find a way of overcoming them.  If people knock you down, as they will, you are able to pick yourself up, dust yourself off and return to your path.  It also means that when doubts creep into your mind, as they will, you are able to listen to their message without being distracted from your purpose.

At its best, persistence allows you to remain open to new ideas because you want to keep learning. If you are persistent, you will seek opportunities to bring people towards your purpose, even if that means modifying your route or some or some of the detail along the way.  You hold true to your purpose (p. 260)."

Think of a time when you were persistent.  What outcomes did you have?

From: Gautrey, C. (2014).  Influential leadership: a leader's guide to getting things done.  London:  Kogan Page.

 

By: Beth Flynn, Monday, August 22nd, 2016
  • "Avoid sweeping statements.  Words such as 'always' and 'never' only make people angry, and defensive.
  • Focus on major responsibilities and performance standards.
  • Ask recipients to identify causes of performance problems.
  • Provide feedback frequently.
  • Discuss behaviors or results, not the person.
  • Specify what needs to be done.
  • Use both positive and negative feedback.
  • Coach rather than judge.
  • Fit feedback to the individual (p. 126)."

What other hints for giving feedback do you have?

From: London, M. (2014). The power of feedback.  New York: Routledge Publishers  

 

By: Beth Flynn, Tuesday, August 02nd, 2016

"As a leader, you will likely be required to compromise on some issues. You will have to take a stand or have a position about various subjects. You should have a clear understanding of those things on which you are unwilling to compromise. That is a natural part of leadership. And it is your job as a leader to build the best culture you can - one that is productive, collaborative, flexible, and fair, and delivers results that matter.

As part of this, you may find a few areas in which you are unwilling to compromise. These usually center on your core values. The likelihood is that you can act out of your core values in a variety of ways without having to compromise them (p. 32)." 

From: Tobin, T. (2015).  Your leadership story: use your story to engergize, inspire and motivate.  Oakland, CA: BerrettKoehler Publishers.

What are some of the areas (core values) that you will are unwillling to compromise?

 

By: Beth Flynn, Tuesday, July 26th, 2016
From: Dyer, W., Dyer, J.H., and Dyer, W.G. (2013).  Team building: proven strategies for improving team performance.  San Francisco: Jossey-Bass


"Do you have what it takes to create an innovative team?  An organization's most valued leaders are those who lead innovative teams - teams that generate and implement valuable new product, process, and strategy ideas.
So what are the characteristics of leaders - and teams - who excel at innovating?
  • A leader with strong innovation skills who leads by example and creates a safe space for others to shine instead of dominating them
  • Team members who possess a complementary mix of innovation and execution skills, as well as complementary expertise in multiple functions and knowledge domains
  • Team processes that explicitly encourage, support, and even require team members to engage in questioning, observing, networking, experimenting, and associational thinking as they hunt for creative solutions to problems
When a team has all of these qualities, it has the capacity to become an innovation lighthouse for an organization.  To realize this role, though, requires a leader fully capable of leading an innovative team (p. 183-184)."
 
What are some ideas you have about how to be an innovative leader?

 

By: Beth Flynn, Tuesday, July 19th, 2016
From: Ellis, C.D. (2013).  What it takes: seven secrets of success from the world's greatest professional firms.  San Francisco:  Wiley.
 
"In an old story, a pilgrim came to the construction site for what would become Chartres Cathedral and asked the stonecutters what they were doing.  One tersely said, 'Squaring this stone.'  Another proudly said, 'Squaring this stone to build a strong wall for a major building.' And the third, with joy in his heart, said with a wide smile, 'Building a great cathedral to honor the glory of God!' With which stonecutter would you want to work (p.5)?"
 
With which stonecutter would you want to work?
 
Which character in this story represents you?
 
 
 

 

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Tags: work, workers, leadership, leaders, management
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By: Beth Flynn, Tuesday, July 19th, 2016
From: Dyer, W., Dyer, J.H., and Dyer, W.G. (2013).  Team building: proven strategies for improving team performance.  San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
 

 Questioning allows innovators to challenge the status quo and consider new possibilities.

  1. Observing helps innovators detect small details in the activities of customers, suppliers, and other companies that suggest new ways of doing things.
  2. Networking permits innovators to gain radically different perspectives by talking to individuals with diverse backgrounds.
  3. Experimenting prompts innovators to try out new experiences, take things apart, and test new ideas through pilots and prototypes.
  4. Associational thinking is a cognitive skill of finding connections among questions, problems or ideas from unrelated fields.  It is triggered by new information brought in through questioning, observing, networking, and experimenting and is the catalyst for creative ideas (p. 185-186)."
  5. Associational thinking is a cognitive skill of finding connections among questions, problems or ideas from unrelated fields.  It is triggered by new information brought in through questioning, observing, networking, and experimenting and is the catalyst for creative ideas (p. 185-186)."

What other skills would you suggest for being a Disruptive Innovator?

 

 

Posted In:
Tags: innovation, innovator, skills, leaders, leadership, management
Comments: 0
By: Beth Flynn, Tuesday, July 19th, 2016
From: Richardson, T. (2015).  The responsible leader: developing a culture of responsibility in an uncertain world.  London:  Kogan Page.
 
 "Responsible leaders are open, confident yet humble.  Moreover, they have personal resilience that comes from this.  Individuals who demonstrate inner strength and personal resilience are able to draw on their personal assuredness from a clear sense of their identity.  This leads to an inner confidence.  However, when this is not balanced with sober self-assessment or mature emotional intelligence, it becomes skewed and egocentric.  It also closes people to other perspectives as these kinds of leader begin to believe their own propaganda and narrative and exclude others' perspectives. 
 
Being truly open is a mindset and orientation.  It says to others that you are approachable and receptive - receptive to the possibility of new ideas, of fresh thinking, of criticism or coaching.  The ability to work collaboratively with others sets apart responsible leaders and to do so effectively requires this orientation; for example, knowing that I will get an appreciative reception when I bring a new way of working to the boss allows me to feel confidence in the first place (p. 38-39)."
 
What ways do you demonstrate being a responsible leader?
 

 

Posted In:
Tags: Leader, leadership, management trust, collaborative
Comments: 0
By: Beth Flynn, Tuesday, June 28th, 2016
  • "Don't blame people for negative outcomes.
  • Don't compare people.
  • Focus on behaviors, not personal characteristics.
  • Attribute good performance to internal causes.
  • Recognize when a team should be praised.
  • Be specific about ways to improve performance.
  • Allow a controlled expression of feelings.
  • Increase goal clarity.
  • Challenge the recipient to do better.
  • Increase the recipient's sense of independence and self-control.
  • Encourage and reinforce a can-do attitude (p.8)."  
From:  London, M. (2014). The power of feedback.  New York: Routledge Publishers
 

 

From:  London, M. (2014). The power of feedback.  New York: Routledge Publishers

 

 

Posted In:
Tags: feedback, leaders, leadership, management, Communication
Comments: 0
By: Beth Flynn, Tuesday, June 28th, 2016
"You may have heard the saying 'Whom you know is more important than what you know.' One thing is for sure: leadership is a relationship business.  Both the quality and quantity of relationship are important aspects of your leadership story. 
 
Navigating the organizational waters and ensuring a broad audience for your leadership story requires you to have a good number of positive relationships (i.e. protagonist or antagonist) and strategic with key relationships (p. 45)."
 
From: Tobin, T. (2015).  Your leadership story: use your story to energize, inspire and motivate. Oakland, CA: Berrett-Koehler Publishers
By: Beth Flynn, Tuesday, June 28th, 2016
"Leaders are responsible for creating a culture of forgiveness, and creating such a culture has many advantages.  To begin with, forgiveness builds loyalty and good corporate citizenship.  In organizations with a forgiveness culture, people are more likely to make an extra effort, which has important consequences for the bottom line.  If people feel that they will not be forgiven for the mistakes they make, they are not going to be at their most productive; they will not take risks and will waste energy worrying about past transgressions.  Forgiveness also helps transgressors to have a more positive outlook on the future.  People are more likely to be open, and less likely to hide mistakes, transgressions and wrongdoings when they operate in a forgiving environment.  They will be more likely to create a coaching culture, a way of interacting that will have a positive effect on the bottom line.  Forgiveness helps create authentic organizations, places of work where people feel their best.
 
To energize their people, truly effective leaders need to be at peace with themselves and past and present events in their life, which includes forgiving others for transgressions, and not bearing grudges.  When we let go of our grudges, we build collaboration reduce conflict, and release a lot of pent-up energy that can be used to move countries, institutions, organizations, teams, and individuals forward.  True forgiveness supports the retention of valued employees, allows greater creativity and innovation, leads to increased profitability, and generates greater openness to change (p. 46-47)."

 

From:  Vries, Manfred F.R. Kets de. (2014). INSEAD Business Press: Mindful Leadership Coaching: Journeys into the Interior. Basingstoke, GBR: Palgrave Macmillan.

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