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By: Beth Flynn, Tuesday, November 17th, 2020

“Growing your character is about having the courage to expand your personal comfort zone within yourself. Staying in our comfort zone where we feel safe, secure, and in control can in fact be the deception of living in self-limiting fear and ego-driven pride. In nearly every aspect of life it takes character for you to be your best self.

Interestingly, when we achieve more in life, it presents us with the opportunity to grow or stay at the edge of our comfort zone. For example, you do well at work and you get a promotion opportunity. Immediately you can experience fear of failure, fear of what others may think of you, questioning whether you can do the job, even feeling you will have to use a fake-it-until-I-make-it strategy. Like it or not, growing character takes courage to face our fears and not mask them with ego-driven pride or hide from them. Developing ourselves means seeing this as the courageous zone – to learn and grow.

1.    Be courageous with myself

2.    Be courageous in new activities

3.    Be courageous with others

4.    Practice forgiveness

5.    Practice gratitude

6.    Practice meditation or prayer (p. 125-132).”

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By: Beth Flynn, Tuesday, November 10th, 2020
  1. "Establishing a Relationship
  2. Negotiating Expectations of Each Other
  3. Targeting Needs
  4. Career Development
  5. Sustaining the Relationship (p. 129-132)."

From: Tkatchov, O., & Tkatchov, M. (2020). Proactive professional learning: creating conditions for individual and organizational improvement. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield.

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The Ohio State University Leadership Center is celebrating 30 years of continued education, professional development, and research-based programming. 

We hope you are able to join us for a complimentary special event on December 4, 2020 from 9-10:30am EST digitally over Zoom

We will be hearing from some of our closest friends; President of Youngstown State University and former coach of Ohio State football, Jim Tressel, and Vice President of Agricultural Administration and Dean of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University, Dr. Cathann Kress. 

You will not want to miss this scarlet and gray extravaganza!

RSVP: https://cvent.me/rMeGOZ

Celebration Invitation

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By: Beth Flynn, Tuesday, November 03rd, 2020

"Parents are constantly talking about and strategizing about their kids. Business leaders do the same about their staff. Parenting and team leadership are two of the toughest things you will ever try, and for many of the same reasons.

  1. Rules without a (proper) relationship leads to rebellion
  2. There is a difference between power and authority
  3. Have a few standards, and stick to them
  4. Be consistent
  5. Ultra-strict and ultra-lenient parents don't produce the best results
  6. Praise in writing; rebuke verbally
  7. Start with people where they are, not where you want them to be
  8. Set the right tone, and everything will take care of itself (p. 233-234)."

From: Throness, T. (2017). The power of people skills: how to eliminate 90% of your hr problems and dramatically increase team and company morale and performance. Wayne, NJ: Career Press.

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By: Beth Flynn, Tuesday, October 27th, 2020

"Relationship management represents the level that all people that want to lead aspire to. This is being able to become a great, brave leader that everyone is proud of. This is to be able to better influence people. It is everything that emotional intelligence culminates into and it defines how you are better able to interact with everyone else. As you are able to better process everything, you become better at understanding the nuances of relationships. You see how to influence and how to lead. To be strong in this competency is to be able to really roll with the ways in which you live. To be strong in this competency is to know that, at the end of the day, you can better control the ways that you see the world. To be strong in this competency is to be capable of changing the world and to make sure that you leave it in a way that is far better than it ever was before you arrived into it (p. 79-80)."

From: Bradberry, B. (2020). Emotional intelligence: develop empathy and increase your emotional agility for leadership, improve your social skills to be successful at work and discover why it can matter more than iq/eq 2.0 [Kindle version]. Retrieved from amazon.com

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By: Beth Flynn, Tuesday, October 20th, 2020
  • "Know that getting better starts on the inside. It's not 'them,' it's you.
  • Ask for feedback (and really listen).
  • Don't shoot the messenger. Have a 'beginners' mind-set.
  • Keep an accountability journal.
  • Seize every opportunity to develop yourself.
  • Hire people that are smarter than you.
  • Get a mentor, be a mentor (or do both).
  • Don't be afraid to change your mind.
  • There is no finish line in learning (p. 47-50)."

From: Studer,Q. (2020). The busy leader's handbook: how to lead people and places that thrive. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley and Sons.

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By: Beth Flynn, Tuesday, October 13th, 2020

"Leadership is an interesting quality. This crazy world can make it seem like you've got to be bossy to be a boss. The notion of having everyone watching you is a cue to your leadership, but so is the idea that you are looking at everyone else.

Real leaders are aware of what is going on in their teams and in their families, and what they can do to make systems and organizations better. True leaders are in the category of their own because they are more concerned with helping others than making themselves look good. All too often people strive to do the right thing in order to be recognized for their accomplishments. If we are comparing ourselves to others, we are really getting distracted. We have an epidemic of insecurity in our world today. We don't know why certain people are chosen to work on certain projects or be promoted in different ways. It is something we have zero control over. If we take the energy we might have wasted trying to figure out why things happen and, instead, use it to work on ourselves and help others, we'll be too occupied with making the world better to ever worry about what he next person is doing. Looking at our life or work as a competition, breeds insecurity that focuses on winning at any cost. When we are kind, we realize we've already won (p.99-100)."

From: Bankert, A. (2020). Your hidden superpower: the kindness that makes you unbeatable at work and connects you with anyone. Nashville: Harper Collins Leadership.

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By: Beth Flynn, Tuesday, October 06th, 2020
  • "Leading for compassion involves becoming a high-level compassion architect.
  • Leading for compassion often entails using communication channels to reach a broad audience and reinforce a culture of shared humanity.
  • Leading for compassion can entail transformation and change of all elements of the organization's social architecture.
  • Leading for compassion involves legitimizing suffering and compassion in the organization and drawing attention to the beauty of compassion in human communities.
  • Leading for compassion evokes emergent patterns of compassion that expand far beyond a centralized approach (p. 278-279)."

From: Worline, M.C., & Dutton, J.E. (2017). Awakening compassion at work. Oakland, CA: Berrett-Koehler Publishers, Inc.

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By: Beth Flynn, Tuesday, September 29th, 2020

"Kindness is the answer because our world is so busy and intense. Inevitably, that can lead to short tempers, burnout, increasing anger, and defensive debates. Witnessing kindness brings renewed hope in humanity in the face of jadedness. Kindness keeps us sane when the demands of juggling work and relationships put us on edge and fill us with the urge to lash out.

We can cause irreparable damage when we are unkind, which can lead to becoming numb or unsympathetic - something none of us can afford. We all have the ability to 'stop the madness' by being purposefully kind.

Kindness added to any endeavor is a magnet for positivity and a cure for the inevitable side effects of stress. Kindness is an anchor to the soul and the universal language of hope for the billions on the planet searching for meaning. Kindness is inclusive. Kindness displays unity. Kindness is beneficial for all and is mandatory for those who are seeking true success, no matter the goal. Kindness is the gateway to new relationships and opportunities. Kindness is what the world needs now more than ever (p. 23-24)."

From: Bankert, A. (2020). Your hidden superpower: the kindness that makes you unbeatable at work and connects you with anyone. Nashville: Harper Collins Leadership.

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By: Beth Flynn, Tuesday, September 22nd, 2020

"In the world of mountain climbing, there's such a thing as a false summit. As you climb toward the summit, from a distance it appears to be the pinnacle of the mountain, your ultimate goal. But as you approach it, you finally see that it is in fact a smaller peak, not the true summit you were aiming for at all. Your hopes dashed, you may despair and even lack the will and desire to continue!

When your dreams, goals, desires and aspirations are grounded in humility and love, they will bring you much joy, fulfillment, and satisfaction. If they are rooted in fear and pride, they will never be enough. They will entice you on but give you nothing more than a short-term fulfillment and leave you forever wanting more and more.

At those times when you ask yourself, What on earth am I here for? We encourage you to set your hearts on the true summits of life. We were created by love, for love. This is why we have hidden gifts, talents, and gold deposited in our hearts. We are here to make the world a better place. We are part of the solution, not part of the problem. When we seek wisdom, we are able to impact positively and leave a legacy.

From the summit of the mountain, train your heart to listen. Train your heart to accept. Train your heart to not be offended. Train your heart to seek wisdom to build your inner character and strength (p. 430-433)."

From: Klemich, S. & Klemich, M. (2020). Above the line: living and leading with heart.  New York: Harper Business

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