Recent Blog Posts

By: Beth Flynn, Tuesday, February 05th, 2019

How to Communicate with Extroverts

  • Extroverts tend to work through their ideas out loud, so expect to do some brainstorming.
  • Be prepared to jump in from time to time with extroverts. Interrupting is not considered rude.
  • When asked what seems like an invasive question, offer just what you are comfortable sharing.
  • If you are caught by surprise with a question, respond that you need a moment to consider it.
  • Send short emails and concise voice mails, and follow up in person with more detail if asked.

How to Communicate with Introverts

  • In meetings and casual conversations, slow down, pause, and give introverts time to reflect and respond.
  • Because introverts need alone time, support teleworking and configuration of office space that supports quiet reflection.
  • Before meetings, send talking points via email or text to give introverts thinking time.
  • Encourage balanced participation in meetings and engage all team members. Monitor how much you speak.
  • If someone seems reserved or quiet, don't ask, 'What's wrong?' Most likely, nothing is wrong. They are in their heads (p. 180-181)."

Are you an introvert or extrovert?  How do you adapt your communication to deal with an extrovert or introvert?

Please note:  Extroversion and introversion is about where you get your energy, not if you are outgoing or shy.  Extroverts get the energy from others, while introverts get their energy from within themselves.

From: Kahnweiler, J. B. (2018). The introverted leader: building on your quiet strength. 2nd edition. Oakland, CA: Berrett-Koehler Publishers, Inc.

By: Beth Flynn, Tuesday, February 05th, 2019
  • "Leading with compassion entails using a leader's interpersonal skills to alleviate suffering in work interactions with followers.
  • Leading with compassion becomes a powerful form of modeling compassion.
  • Leaders can build skill in allowing suffering to surface, engaging in sensitive inquiry work, remaining mindful, attuning to others, and listening with empathy.
  • Seeing compassion modeled in everyday work interactions opens up the possibility that an organization's members can take compassion from work to home, improving their family and community relationships (p. 264-265)."

How do you demonstrate compassion to others?

From: Worline, M.C., & Dutton, J.E. (2017). Awakening compassion at work. Oakland CA: Berrett-Koehler Publishers, Inc.
 

By: Beth Flynn, Tuesday, February 05th, 2019

"There's an old saying: 'History doesn't repeat itself, but it rhymes.' That's especially true when we're thinking of our personal histories. Why? The circumstances of our lives change week by week, year by year. But we're still standing. And our habits of thinking tend to produce consistent results no matter what's going on in our work, relationships, or the world around us.

If our habits of thinking are beneficial, we tend to experience positive results, such as happiness, personal satisfaction, even material success. If our habits of thinking are counterproductive, however, we often experience the opposite: unhappiness, dissatisfaction, and the nagging feeling that the deck is somehow stacked against us.

The good news is that you can change the rhyme scheme. Even if your habits of thinking are already serving you well, you can experience transformative personal improvement in all areas of your life by upgrading your beliefs. When we focus on belief improvement, often our circumstances follow suit (p. 38-39)."

 

What are some things you do to change your thinking when you start having negative thoughts?

 

From: Hyatt, M. (2018). Your best year ever: a 5-step plan for achieving your most important goals. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books.
 

 

 

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By: Beth Flynn, Tuesday, January 08th, 2019

"As a leader, you want to share the organizational purpose with the purpose of inspiring others to join the mission and be on a mission. You want to let everyone know why your organization exists and why their work matters. Many think they have to work at a homeless shelter or go to Africa to make a difference. They think they have to find meaning and purpose outside their work. And while it's wonderful if they want to volunteer for a charity or feel called to go on a mission trip, as a leader you want to remind your team that you don't have to go on a mission trip to be on a mission. You can bring your mission, passion, and purpose to the work that you do each day. Tell your people that you may not build libraries around the world, but you can find the bigger purpose in reading to your children. You may not feed the homeless every day, but you can nourish your employees and customers with a smile, kind word, and care. And while you may not start your own nonprofit organization, you can begin a charity initiative at work. After all, charity means 'love in action.' You can make a difference every day and touch the lives of everyone you meet. While these people may not be starving because of a lack of food, you can provide them with a different kind of nourishment that will feed their souls and feed your own in the process (p.202-203)."

From: Gordon, J. (2017). The power of positive leadership: how and why positive leaders transform teams and organizations and change the world. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley and Sons.

What are you doing to inspire others to live their purpose?

 

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By: Beth Flynn, Tuesday, January 08th, 2019

"There's an old saying: 'History doesn't repeat itself, but it rhymes.' That's especially true when we're thinking of our personal histories. Why? The circumstances of our lives change week by week, year by year. But we're still standing. And our habits of thinking tend to produce consistent results no matter what's going on in our work, relationships, or the world around us.

If our habits of thinking are beneficial, we tend to experience positive results, such as happiness, personal satisfaction, even material success. If our habits of thinking are counterproductive, however, we often experience the opposite: unhappiness, dissatisfaction, and the nagging feeling that the deck is somehow stacked against us.

The good news is that you can change the rhyme scheme. Even if your habits of thinking are already serving you well, you can experience transformative personal improvement in all areas of your life by upgrading your beliefs. When we focus on belief improvement, often our circumstances follow suit (p. 38-39)."

From: Hyatt, M. (2018). Your best year ever: a 5-step plan for achieving your most important goals. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books.

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By: Beth Flynn, Monday, November 14th, 2016

1.     Keep an open mind about the view of others

2.     Show genuine concern for other people

3.     Encourage openness and honesty

4.     Communicates clear objectives

5.     Demonstrate commitment to personal and organizational values

6.     Display confidence and capability (p. 164).”

 

What are some things you do to build trust?

 

From: Gautrey, C. (2014).  Influential leadership: a leader’s guide to getting things done.  London:  Kogan Page.

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By: Beth Flynn, Tuesday, October 18th, 2016

“When it comes to knowing yourself, you are likely to have some blind spots.  We all do.  Unfortunately, not seeing ourselves accurately can have negative consequences.  We may over-estimate our performance and then are surprised when we are passed over for promotion.  Even when the outcomes are not as consequential, we miss opportunities to change our behavior.  Underestimating our performance can also be detrimental.  We may have done well in others’ eyes, but having a low image of our performance can cause us unnecessary stress and may make us take actions that preclude opportunities that could have been open to us.

Fortunately, there is a way we can improve our self-knowledge. This is called ‘mindfulness’ – paying attention to our current experiences without evaluating them.  Being mindful without evaluating ourselves has two advantages: it gives us more and higher-quality information about ourselves and it overcomes our natural tendency to protect our ego (p. 38-39).”

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By: Beth Flynn, Tuesday, October 18th, 2016
  1. "Be a good coach.
  2. Empower your team and don't micromanage.
  3. Express interest in team members' success and personal well-being.
  4. Don't be a sissy.  Be productive and results oriented
  5. Be a good communicator and listen to your team.
  6. Help your employees with career development.
  7. Have a clear vision and strategy for the team.
  8. Have key technical skills so you can help advise the team (p. 72-73)."
 
 
From: Hurwitz, M. & Hurwitz, S. (2015).  Leadership is half the story: a fresh look at followership, leadership, and collaboration.  Guelph, Ontario: University of Toronto Press.
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By: Beth Flynn, Tuesday, October 04th, 2016

“You are a unique human being, and there is no one else like you in the world.  You have unique gifts, talents, and perspectives that you bring to your relationships with others.  You have experience and knowledge that position you to make the world a better place. 

Consider all of the roles you play in the work you do and the life you lead.  Think about the difference your efforts have made to your networks over the course of a lifetime.

Your belief in yourself can form a steady cadence that drives your movement through this world.  It can help you honor yourself: your inner courage, your willingness to take risks and open doors, your ability to be vulnerable and extend forgiveness.  It can put up a strong barrier between you and those who would ask you to compromise your inner spirit and what you know to be right.

Your belief in yourself can illuminate your way forward when you’re surrounded by uncertainty or confusion.  When you believe that you are a naturally caring person, that you want to do the right thing, and that you are on a search to become the best version of yourself (p. 186-188).”

What are two gifts/talents that make you unique?

From: Reina, D. and Reina, M. (2015).  Trust and betrayal in the workplace: building effective relationships in your organization. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler Publishers.

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By: Beth Flynn, Wednesday, September 28th, 2016
  1. "Credibility: the power derived from your professional standing and expertise.
  2. Character: the underlying traits, values and beliefs that shape your behavior.
  3. Presence: the impact you create and the feelings you stimulate when people meet you.
  4. Position: the roles you play and how you maneuver yourself into the limelight.
  5. Connections: the network of relationships you have around you and your work.
  6. Skills: those exceptional abilities you have that enable you to get things done.
  7. Agenda: the issues and priorities you focus your leadership attention on (p. 29)."
 
From: Gautrey, C. (2014).  Influential leadership: a leader's guide to getting things done.  London:  Kogan Page.

 

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