Recent Blog Posts

By: Beth Flynn, Monday, August 18th, 2014
  1. Your philosophy of life and leadership determines the process by which you lead.
  2. Your positive attitude affects everyone around you.
  3. Your experience and past history of success provides comfort and assurance as you make decisions to move forward.
  4. When you lead by example, there is nothing your people will not do for you and with you.
  5. Your “likeability” can affect the quality and effectiveness of your leadership.  Be or become likeable.
  6. Clear communication leads to understanding and action.
  7. Responsibility is not given: it’s taken.
  8. Collaboration will earn respect, results, and reputation.
  9. Do what you say.  Fulfill what you promise.
  10. Take more than a minute to praise, coach, inform and train.
  11. Know the high ground of winning, and the stomping ground of defeat.
  12. Resilience is your internal force to react, respond, and recover from events and people.
  13. The courage to risk, be right, and be wrong.
  14. Separate task from person.  Then assign them and combine them to achieve a positive outcome.
  15. Reward individual and group achievement.
  16. You must earn, not command, both trust and respect.
  17. Encourage THEIR success to earn and achieve yours.
  18. Your ability to influence people will manifest itself in successful outcomes.
  19. Your reputation precedes you, and defines you.

19.5Legacy is built with single achievements piled high on one another (Gitomer, 2011, p. 17-21).

  • What additional principles of leadership would you add to this list?

From:  Gitomer, J (2011).  Jeffrey gitomer’s little book of leadership: the 12.5 strengths of responsible, reliable, remarkable leaders that create results, rewards and resilience.  Hoboken, NJ: Wiley and Sons

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By: Beth Flynn, Monday, August 18th, 2014
  1. Clarity is Essential
  2. Competence is Critical
  3. Identify Your Constraints
  4. Unlock Your Creativity
  5. Concentrate Single-Mindedly
  6. Have the Courage of Your Convictions
  7. Develop Your Character
  8. Plan Every Detail in Advance
  9. Organize Your Work Before You Begin
  10. Staff Properly at Every Level
  11. Delegate Effectively
  12. Inspect What You Expect
  13. Keep the Boss Informed
  14. Focus on High Productivity
  15. Commit to Quality in Everything
  16. Concentrate on Continuous Improvement
  17. Innovate Continually (Tracy, 2011, p. 195-211).

 

  • What are some additional management principles that come to mind?
  • What are two principles you can commit to this week?

 

From:  Tracy, B (2011).  Full engagement: inspire, motivate, and bring out the best in your people.  New York: AMACOM

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Tags: managing, management, leadership, leaders, lead, competencies, principles
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By: Beth Flynn, Monday, August 18th, 2014

“When the young Beatles were performing at the Cavern Club n Liverpool in the early 1960's, they were unknown.  Enter Brian Epstein, who ran a family furniture store.  He had utterly no credentials to become the Beatles’ manager.  But they hired him and he was instrumental in helping them rise to fame.

Do you know what was the possibly his greatest contribution to the Beatles? His utter and total belief in their greatness, well before they were recognized by the broader public.

‘They were going to be bigger than Elvis,’ he confidently told anyone who would listen.  Epstein relentlessly promoted the group, eventually getting them a record deal. And they did become bigger than Elvis, ultimately selling over 1.4 billion records.  The Beatles innate talent was fundamental to their success, but Epstein’s unwavering belief in the young John, Paul, George, and Ringo was absolutely essential to their early development.

Start telling others how you believe in them (p.23).                  

  •        Who are three people you can share your belief in them this week?

 

  • Who has had the biggest impact on your career, do to their belief in you?  

 

From: Sobel, A. & Panas, J. Power relationships: 26 irrefutable laws for building extraordinary relationships.  Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, NJ.

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By: Beth Flynn, Monday, August 18th, 2014
  1. Maintaining and raising quality
  2. Developing and improving systems
  3. Coaching employee performance
  4. Communicating across the organization
  5. Collaborating across the organization
  6. Resolving conflicts
  7. Building employee motivation
  8. Leading with emotional intelligence
  9. Building teams and team performance
  10. Managing change
  11. Managing your time and priorities
  12. Working with ethics and integrity (p. 6)

How are you practicing the twelve core management competencies?

What is one competency you are willing to commit to improving this week?

 

From:  Geisler, J.  (2012).  Work happy: what great bosses know.  New York:  Center Street.

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By: Beth Flynn, Monday, August 11th, 2014

“What I mean by Star is connecting to your true self and living your life to the fullest.  For one person, that might mean becoming an amazingly inspirational second-grade teacher.  For another, it might mean being an exceptionally gentle and popular dentist.

As long as you are being true to yourself, it doesn’t matter what career you star in.  Nor is it important whether the stage you choose is for a relatively small audience or for millions.  What counts most is that you pursue what’s right for you, and you consistently give 100 percent of yourself to achieve the best performance.

If you’re great about what you do, recognition will follow.  And while being recognized as a Star might not be your goal, your example will inspire others to follow their life’s path – which should be worth any temporary discomfort you experience from your celebrity (p. 135). 

 

How do you know if you are living your life’s path?

What is one thing you can commit to inspire others to follow their life’s path?

 

From: Olsher, S. (2013).  What is your what?: discover the one amazing thing you were born to do.  Hoboken, NJ: Wiley & Sons

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By: Jody Termeer, Tuesday, August 05th, 2014

1.    Self-awareness

2.    Ability to trust

3.    Ability to use imagery

4.    Ability to identify blocks when they occur

5.    Recognizing the importance of adversity (p. 7)

 

What additional characteristics of Exceptional Coaches can you add to this list?

      What was the best advice you have received from a coach?

 

From:  Jensen, P. (2012).  The winning factor.  New York:  AMACom.

By: Beth Flynn, Monday, July 28th, 2014

Model the Way

  • Clarify values by finding your vice and affirming shared values.
  • Set the example by aligning actions with shared values.

Inspire a Shared Vision

  • Envision the future by imagining exciting and enabling possibilities.
  • Enlist others in a common vision by appealing to shared aspirations.

Challenge the Process

  • Search for opportunities by seizing the initiative and looking outward for innovation.
  • Experiment and take risks by constantly generating small wins and learning from experience.

Enable Others to Act

  • Foster collaboration by building trust and facilitating relationships.
  • Strengthen others by increasing self-determination and developing competence. 

Encourage the Heart

  • Recognize contributions by showing appreciation for individual excellence.
  • Celebrate the values and victories by creating a spirit of community. (p. 29)
     

How do you demonstrate the five practices of exemplary leadership?

What is one of the ten leadership commitments that you will practice this week?

 

From: Kouzes, J. and Posner, B. (2012) The leadership challenge: how to make extraordinary things happen in organizations.  John Wiley and Sons, Hoboken, NJ.  

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By: Beth Flynn, Monday, July 21st, 2014

“Our workplaces are full of human “doings,” not human “ beings.” So says Mitch Ditkoff, the man who spends his days trying to humanize corporate work environments.

“Most people tamp down their real selves when they go to work.  However, if you want to bring your ‘A’ game you have to bring your real self to work each day.  That’s the only way the best of your natural creativity will emerge.”

Human beings are thoughtful, inspiring, compassionate and creative, so why don’t we bring this into the workplace?

 

How are you going to bring your ‘A’ game to work each day?

Why do you think that people feel the need to tone down who they are, rather than bring their authentic self to work?

 

From: Ades, E. (2013).  The positivity handbook

By: Beth Flynn, Monday, July 14th, 2014
  • Be able to build AWARENESS.
  • Be 100% RESPONSIBLE.
  • IDENTIFY the purpose and value in every experience.
  • ENGAGE! People are so much bigger and greater than they appear.

How do you demonstrate positive leadership?

What are some ideas to engage with others?

 

From: Ades, E. (2013).  The positivity handbook

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By: Beth Flynn, Tuesday, June 24th, 2014

One evening, an old Cherokee told his grandson about a conflict that goes on inside people.  He said, “My son, the battle is between two wolves within is all.  One is evil.  It is anger, envy, jealousy, sorrow, regret, worry, greed, arrogance, self-pity, guilt, resentment, inferiority, lies, false pride, superiority and ego.  The other one is Good.  It is joy, peace, love, hope, serenity, wisdom, humility, kindness, benevolence, empathy, generosity, truth compassion and faith.”

The grandson thought this for a minute and then asked his grandfather, “Which wolf wins?  The old Cherokee simply replied, “The one you feed.” (p. 49)
 

How are you going to make sure the “good wolf” wins in your life?

 

Senn, L. (2013).  Up the mood elevator.  

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